National Day for Truth and Reconciliation – September 30

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation – September 30

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Canadian flag – half-mast National Day for Truth and Reconciliation – September 30
Canadian flag – half-mast National Day for Truth and Reconciliation – September 30 Photo Mosaic Edition Edward Akinwunmi

The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is September 30, 2021.

The day is set aside to honour the lost children and Survivors of residential schools, their families and communities.

Citizens are encouraged to wear orange colour to mark the day. The colour is in remembrance of Phyllis Webstad, from the First Nation who arrived at school on first day in an orange shirt, which was taken away from her.  Indigenous organizations chose the orange colour to represent the stripping away of culture, freedom, and self esteem experienced by indigenous children over generations.

Shoes on the steps of City Hall St. Catharines - Special ceremony to remember the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were found recently in unmarked graves took place June 8, 2021 in St. Catharines. Photo Mosaic Edition Edward Akinwunmi
Shoes on the steps of City Hall St. Catharines – Special ceremony to remember the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were found recently in unmarked graves took place June 8, 2021 in St. Catharines. Photo Mosaic Edition Edward Akinwunmi

Shoes on display on the steps of municipal building, St. Catharines. The display was part of ceremony to honour children lost in the residential schools and their survivors. The Indigenous community in Niagara organized the remembrance event.

It is a day to learn about the injustices meted to Indigenous peoples of Canada.

Special ceremony to remember the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were found recently in unmarked graves took place June 8, 2021in St. Catharines. Photo Mosaic Edition Edward Akinwunmi
Special ceremony to remember the 215 Indigenous children whose remains were found recently in unmarked graves took place June 8, 2021in St. Catharines. Photo Mosaic Edition Edward Akinwunmi

Canadian flag has been flown at half-mast since the discovery of the remains of 215 residential school children at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School, BC.

Niagara Region said in a statement that it is marking the day by offering staff a series of educational and training sessions on the history of Indigenous People in Niagara through a series of short videos developed by the Fort Erie Native Friendship Centre.

Niagara Region is encouraging everyone to consider supporting local Indigenous organizations, including The Fort Erie Native Friendship Centre, the Niagara Regional Native Centre, Niagara Chapter of Native Women, and the Woodland Cultural Centre.

During the electioneering campaign for the 44th Parliament, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the  Canadian flag would continue to be at half-mast until a decision is reached with Indigenous community on when to raise the flag.

“It will take the time it will take. We will continue to work with Indigenous leadership on when the right moment will be to raise those flags once again,” said Trudeau.

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